Session 2: The Google Generation

Audio from the session
[audio:http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/avfiles/events/2008/07/session2c.mp3]
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This session looked at generational variations in the usage of Web 2.0 tools, and young people’s expectations of ICT provision at university. The ensuing debate examined whether ICT/Web 2.0 tool usage by universities should be student-led, and discussed whether or not the changing skillset applicable to ‘information literacy’ has affected quality of student work.

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Session 2: Capacity and skills issues

Audio from the session
[audio:http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/avfiles/events/2008/07/session2b.mp3]
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This session was chaired by Joy Davidson (Digital Curation Centre) and took the form of a brainstorm.

Three main areas were covered. The session began by thinking about the careers of researchers, and discussion centred on how data management can be embedded from the earliest possible opportunity, right across people’s lives (looking at digital literacy from primary school to the skills of experienced data scientists). The fact that data management skills are not seen as important was discussed, with a need for reaching into different disciplines and raising awareness (particularly badging and tailoring training in ways that researchers are likely to recognise and respond to) a recommended response.

The session also discussed the need for a canon of digital curation practice, from which more disciplinary research and training can be drawn – is it possible to define a canon of generic data curation practice that is valid across disciplines, and should that canon be called ‘curation’? (would data science or managment be a better term?).

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Session 1: e-Content Business Models and Sustainability – From theory into practice

Audio from the session
[audio:http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/avfiles/events/2008/07/session1d.mp3]
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Emma Beer from The Strategic Content Alliance at JISC shares her thoughts on the session:

“We heard from four entertaining speakers on business models and sustainability. Key themes from all speakers were a need to create usable content that would be effective and useful to the intended audiences, and also a need to look beyond funding to bring in extra income streams.

“There was a great deal of interest in this session and I am very pleased the SCA is planning to invest a great deal more in understanding this complex field that I hope can in turn inform the debate on JISC funding policies going forward. From a personal viewpoint, I think it’s important to encourage a great deal more innovation in business models so that a great deal more projects and initiatives can benefit from JISC funding.

“Government initiatives aimed at opening up public sector information (see for instance the signing of the Seoul Declaration on the Future of the Internet Economy by OECD countries in the last month) and the business models to underpin this sort of work will also be key to this debate.”

Speakers’ presentations are available to download at the end of this post.

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Session 1: Web 2.0, IPR and You

Audio from the session
[audio:http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/avfiles/events/2008/07/session1e.mp3]
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IPR has long been a back-shelf issue. That’s to say, many people don’t want to engage with it because it’s seen as complex and can have worrying implications. It’s an issue that should be prioritised but it’s tempting to take the ostrich approach…

The aim of this session was to help people take their heads from the sand – and to show that once people do engage, the tools are there to provide a pathway through the thorns and briars of intellectual property.

Indeed, this is one of the ways that JISC can provide protection for your own work, as well as helping you to avoid stepping on other people’s toes.

The talk was presented by Naomi Korn & Dr Neil Witt

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Session 1: Community engagement and a typology of barriers

Audio from the session
[audio:http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/avfiles/events/2008/07/session1a.mp3]
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Alex Voss (e-uptake project) National Centre for E-Social Science.

In this session the e-Uptake project from the JISC User engagement programme looks at the present barriers in uptake of e-Infrastructure in academia. This project is one of three working closely together to get to grips with the issues.
The e-uptake project takes an in-depth and multi layered approach to handle such a complex field of work.
There are many ways to tackle the technical issues involved, which are described in this session.

But, how far can you go in describing the issues, without getting stuck in the human aspects of cultural change?

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Session 1: Listening to Learners

Audio from the session
[audio:http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/avfiles/events/2008/07/session1c.mp3]
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This session was a workshop rather than a formal presentation and panel debate, and was led by a project team who have worked on projects to elicit students’ ideas and experiences of the technologies they use in their studies. The group activities included trying out some of the elicitation techniques and feeding back on how effective the methodologies are.

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Session 1: Legal and policy issues

Audio from the session
[audio:http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/avfiles/events/2008/07/session1b.mp3]
To downlod the MP3 click here

The motion being debated in this session is “Curating and sharing research data is best done where the researcher’s institution asserts IPR claims over the data”.

Initial discussion centred around what was the right approach to IPR and copyright that would enable curation and data sharing to take place. Some people argued for the Science Commons approach (ie that as soon as possible, all data should be put into the public domain with all rights waived) which was seen as a simple and effective way of sharing data. Others felt the challenge here was to get researchers to accept this approach – and thought that licensing data was the way forward. There was discussion around who was the rights holder – it’s not clear (a) what the rights are and (b) who owns them.

An interesting point was made about EU legislation, which requires any public sector institution creating data to supply it at cost price for commercial organisations to re-use. Universities may in time be included under this proposed legisation.

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